Tethered to a threadbare string, to a world that is no longer yours to take;
to a fate that is long past due. The burden of your chains are a solace
to the hollow within.

—J. Saelee, Threadbare

I travel. I write.
INTJ: Mastermind rational
More about me: +Google

Literature: deviantART
Photographs: Vagrancy Tumblr
Mien Blog: Qiānjiādòng—the Big Twelve

I usually don't follow back.

Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

To the north of the dun territory, in Orkney and Shetland, Caithness and Skye, appeared a series of tall, tapering, stone towers, clearly designed as fortifications and known as brochs. As Euan MacKie has observed, these were the only advanced architectural buildings ever to be created entirely within prehistoric Britain, apart from Stonehenge. About 500 of them are known in northern Scotland where some of them once stood 9 m. (10 yd) or more in height and over 20 m. (22 yd) in diameter (plate 51). Each circular tower consists of an inner and outer layer of dry-stone walling tied together with a series of horizontal lintels which bridge the gap between them. In this space, which is about 1 m. (1 yd) wide, are a series of galleries superimposed one above the other and a slab-built staircase which climbs clock-wise to the top of the tower. The galleries were probably intended only to lighten the weight of the tower wall, thus allowing it to be built higher. The total thickness of the wall at its base was about 4.5 m. (5 yd).

Read more.

To the north of the dun territory, in Orkney and Shetland, Caithness and Skye, appeared a series of tall, tapering, stone towers, clearly designed as fortifications and known as brochs. As Euan MacKie has observed, these were the only advanced architectural buildings ever to be created entirely within prehistoric Britain, apart from Stonehenge. About 500 of them are known in northern Scotland where some of them once stood 9 m. (10 yd) or more in height and over 20 m. (22 yd) in diameter (plate 51). Each circular tower consists of an inner and outer layer of dry-stone walling tied together with a series of horizontal lintels which bridge the gap between them. In this space, which is about 1 m. (1 yd) wide, are a series of galleries superimposed one above the other and a slab-built staircase which climbs clock-wise to the top of the tower. The galleries were probably intended only to lighten the weight of the tower wall, thus allowing it to be built higher. The total thickness of the wall at its base was about 4.5 m. (5 yd).

Read more.

  1. nangoat reblogged this from archaeoillustration
  2. stulowitz reblogged this from bassman5911
  3. dragoblah reblogged this from bassman5911
  4. bassman5911 reblogged this from 336bc
  5. 336bc reblogged this from gwebarchaeology
  6. earlyscotland reblogged this from cmedinburgh
  7. cmedinburgh reblogged this from gwebarchaeology
  8. olduvaigorge reblogged this from theladygoogle
  9. archaeoillustration reblogged this from magnius159
  10. earthisalie reblogged this from gwebarchaeology
  11. peedieblogger reblogged this from gwebarchaeology
  12. femmeempathmagus reblogged this from queerkhmer
  13. queerkhmer reblogged this from thothofnorth
  14. thothofnorth reblogged this from theladygoogle
  15. theladygoogle reblogged this from gwebarchaeology
  16. magnius159 posted this